Do You Get Enough Vitamin C In Your Diet?

Is it possible to get too much vitamin C? Yes, but it’s also possible that you may not be getting enough to support important immune functions in your body. I happen to love this vitamin. It does so much for our health and is readily available in so many fruits and vegetables.  The RDA of vitamin C is 75 – 90 mg/day for adults, but as in most RDA for vitamins and minerals, it is not enough to keep your blood levels high.

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored in the body.  They are eliminated in our urine, so excess amounts are excreted, thus overdose is not a concern. But it’s still important not to exceed the safe upper limit of 2,000 milligrams a day to avoid stomach upset and diarrhea.

Our bodies cannot make vitamin C. In order to reap the health benefits of vitamin C, you must have a continual supply in your diet, or take a dietary supplement.

Eating vitamin C-rich foods is the best method to ensure an adequate intake of this vitamin. While many common foods contain vitamin C, the best food sources are citrus fruits. One orange, a kiwi fruit, 6 oz. of grapefruit juice or 1/3 cup of chopped sweet red pepper each supply enough vitamin C for one day.

Still, American Dietetic Association spokeswoman Dee Sandquist, RD, suggests doing your best to work more fruits and vegetables into your diet before taking supplements.

“Strive to eat nine servings of fruits and vegetables daily, because you will get a healthy dose of vitamin C along with an abundance of other vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals that are good for disease prevention and overall health,” she says.

Here are all the foods and beverages you’d need to consume in a day to reach 500 milligrams (mg):

  • Cantaloupe, 1 cup: 59 mg Vitamin C
  • Orange juice, 1 cup: 97 mg
  • Broccoli, cooked, 1 cup: 74 mg
  • Red cabbage, 1/2 cup: 40 mg
  • Green pepper, 1/2 cup, 60 mg
  • Red pepper, 1/2 cup, 95 mg
  • Kiwi, 1 medium: 70 mg
  • Tomato juice, 1 cup: 45 mg

I know what you are thinking. Most Americans eat on the go, fast food, or simple don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables a day to get 50 mg of vitamin C, let alone 500 mg. Especially parents of special needs kids and their picky eating habits. I know only one friend that has her son eat this many vegetables a day, and he is also on the gf/cf diet.  She is one smart cookie and started him out at a young age eating fruits and vegetables. I wish I’d done that with my sons at an early age. I am now struggling with getting my son with autism to try new fruits and vegetables. My older son’s palate is much more daring and he likes to try a variety of new recipes; even if they include vegetables. But since vitamin C is water-soluble, veggies lose its vitamin C when cooked. Raw veggies are best, but sometimes just not a reality for most families.

Why do we need vitamin C?

The body needs this vitamin to keep it in good working order. Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin C helps hold body cells together, aids in wound healing, assists in bone and tooth formation, strengthens the blood vessel walls, is vital for the function of the immune system, and improves absorption and utilization of iron. It is also a natural anti-histamine.

Vitamin C is an antioxidant and it works with vitamin E as a free-radical scavenger. Studies suggest that vitamin C reduces the risk of certain cancers, heart disease, stroke, and cataracts.

Stress reduces our bodies vitamin C supply. Vitamin C can benefit individuals whose immune system is weakened by stress. Because it is one of the nutrients sensitive to stress, it is the first nutrient to be depleted in alcoholics, smokers and obese individuals.

Vitamin C is heavily concentrated in the brain and crucial to brain function. The earliest signs of deficiency is confusion and depression. Studies have shown vitamin C to improve cognition and alertness.

Vitamin C supplements are plentiful on the market. Something you should consider is the source of the vitamin. Most vitamin C supplements are derived from corn. This created a problem for my oldest son since he showed an allergy to corn. I found a corn and citrus-free version by Twinlabs called Allergy C. It’s made from sago palm. Keep in mind that sago palm contains salicylates if your child reacts to them. I give it with the morning digestive enzyme TriEnza that contains No Phenol digestive enzyme.

I give my son with autism a vitamin C supplement. He gets 250 mg in the morning and another 250 mg after school. This helps maintain a more even blood level than taking all 500 mg at once. When he is sick with a cold I up the dose to 750-1,000 mg/day. He takes a corn-based supplement since he has phenol sensitivity and no allergy to corn.

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Colostrum Isn’t Just for Babies

Nature’s first milk. Golden, life-sustaining. Gut healing. Immune boosting. Colostrum is not just for babies, anymore.  It is for any child or adult that may benefit from its wonderful healing properties.

What is Colostrum?

It is the first milk from humans and animals, produced by the mammary glands in late pregnancy and in the days after giving birth. During the first few days after birth, colostrum provides the necessary immune and growth factors (IgG and IgF), to stimulate growth of muscle, skin, cartilage, nerve and bone tissue.

What are the benefits?

Colostrum has been shown to aid in a variety of  disorders such as:

  • allergies and asthma
  • sinus problems, colds & flu
  • irritable bowel syndrome/leaky gut syndrome/ulcers
  • auto-immune disorders
  • diabetes
  • chronic fatigue
  • arthritis/rheumatoid arthritis

The health benefits of colostrum can be attributed to the fact that it contains 97 immune factors, 87 growth factors and a variety of different probiotics along with prebiotics that help grow and feed the beneficial flora in the colostrum and in your gut. The prebiotics in colostrum act as a food source for the ‘good bacteria’, enhancing the health of the gut and therefore immune system. Prebiotics can also improve bowel function as healthy levels of good bacteria can assist with constipation.

The high levels of IgG (immunoglobulin) provide exceptional immune boosting properties to prevent disease.  Immunoglobulins (IgG) are protein molecules that function as antibodies and play a major role in intestinal immune defense.

In 1980, a British researcher showed that a large proportion of the antibodies and immunoglobulins in colostrum are not absorbed by the body but remain in the digestive tract. Clinical studies have demonstrated that colostrum is effective in preventing intestinal infections by first keeping the bacteria from attaching themselves to the intestinal wall, and secondly by killing the bacteria themselves. Colostrum has proven capable of killing Campylobacter, Helicobacter pylori, Listeria, Salmonella, Shigellosis, and five types of streptococci.

A high level of IGF (insulin-like growth hormone) in colostrum stimulates tissue building and repair in adults.  It is highly beneficial in combating the effects of aging  joints, leaky digestive systems and assisting athletes build lean muscle.

The antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial properties of colostrum enable it to kill such pathogens as E. coli, Candida albicans, rotaviruses, and Cryptosporidium.

The proline-rich polypeptides (PRP) in colostrum has been demonstrated to reduce or eliminate the pain, swelling, and inflammation associated with allergies and autoimmune diseases (multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus). Many children with autism test positive for autoimmune disorders, and colostrum can help to regulate this dysfunction. These effects are related to PRP’s ability to inhibit the overproduction of lymphocytes (white blood cells) and T-cells.

What we experienced with Colostrum:

When you begin taking colostrum, you’ll need to start with a low dose for a week or two and then increase it. Our sons took 1/4 tsp. in the morning and night before increasing the dose to 1/2 tsp. in the AM/PM.  The first thing I noticed was emotion regulation was affected. Increased tears, anger and easy frustration levels may have been a result from the initial die-off reaction of bacteria in the gut. Once the body adjusted, these behaviors disappeared.  Then we saw allergy symptoms lessen, improved bowel function and overall health in skin tone and hair.

For families on the GF/CF diet, Kirkman Labs sells Colostrum Gold that is a liquid (flavored or unflavored). They claim that it is casein free and does not contain any synthetic hormones, pesticides or antibiotics. It does not contain sugar, soy, wheat, casein, gluten, preservatives, yeast, gelatin, artificial flavorings or colorings. But it does contain milk. We use Kirkman’s Colostrum Gold flavored version mixed in a little bit of juice. The unflavored has a pretty foul taste, so make your choice wisely based on your child’s tolerance of nasty tasting things.

For the science geek in you, read further to discover the properties of colostrum:

Growth hormones – TGF, IGF-I, IGF-II

Immunoglobulins – IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE

Lactoferrin iron binding protein – for resisting intestinal bacteria and free radical damage

Retinoic Acid – destroys viruses, stimulates healing

Proline-rich Polypeptides (PRP) – for calming overactive immune system; stimulating under-active immune system

Glycoproteins – help immune and growth factors survive the highly acidic digestive system

Lactobacillus Bifidus Acidophilus – helps promote healthy bacteria to combat Candida albicans and irritable bowel syndrome

Interferon – inhibits viral activity

Interleukin-2 – a cytokine that stimulates cell growth in the immune system

Lysoenzyme protein – attacks bacteria

Oligosaccharides – block attachment of bacteria especially S.pheumponococci to mucous membranes, thereby aiding in the prevention of respiratory inflammation

Cartilage Inducing Factor A, as well as vitamins and minerals

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